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Order your subscription, or renew and existing subscription, and CHOOSE YOUR GIFT! Pick a Fish and Game Cookbook (valued at $5), or two tickets to The Newfoundland Sportsman Outdoor Expo (valued at $8 each) coming up May 4th-5th 2018. It’s the most fun you can have indoors!

Be sure to get your orders in before December 15th to take advantage of this offer. Don’t forget to let us know your choice in the “notes to seller” section of your order. Thanks for joining the Newfoundland Sportsman family!

More Hunting in Final Issue of 2017

Moose, caribou, bear, rabbits, partridge… if you’re interested in hunting, the November-December 2017 edition of the Newfoundland Sportsman magazine will surely whet your appetite.

While one avid hunter/writer marvels at the thrill of hunting big game with bows and arrows – and experiences great success in the process during recent caribou hunts with friends – a local guide makes no bones about his disdain for harvesting animals this way.

Gord Follett recounts a friend’s tense moments during a black bear hunt, Phil O’Neil pens a piece on recent ptarmigan hunting adventures, while Jeff Hutchings writes about a rabbit hunt which went “from ideal to impossible.”

Derek Brace tells us about his late season moose hunting success, while Chef Maurice Boudreau provides a simply mouth-watering recipe for grouse.

In his editorial, Gord gives credit to those responsible for finally changing legislation to allow youth to legally hunt in the province.

These articles and more are featured in the November-December issue of the Newfoundland Sportsman magazine.

Our cover photo, by Cliff Doran, features a mature bull moose from the Trepassey area of Newfoundland’s Southern Shore.

We hope you enjoy this edition of our magazine. Now to get working on our January-February 2018 issue.

Youth Hunting Regulations

As promised in Gord Follett’s editorial in the current November/December 2017 edition of the Newfoundland Sportsman magazine, here are more details on the provincial government’s late-October announcement regarding changes to wildlife/hunting regulations.

 

New Wild Life Regulations for Youth Hunting and Trapping Licences

  • The Government of Newfoundland and Labrador announced changes to minimum age firearms use provisions under the Wild Life Regulations for hunting and fur bearer animal trapping licences. Provincial regulations allow:
  • Youth starting at age 12 to hold a licence to shoot small game, fur bearing animals, and coyotes. Youth may hold a licence to shoot big game at 16 years of age.
  • The regulations require youth to have the consent of a parent or person who has custody of the youth to purchase a licence.
  • Where required, a youth must also be accompanied by a designated adult while hunting, taking or killing animals by shooting.
  • The legislation is effective immediately.

General Summary of Provincial Wild Life Regulations for Youth

Youth at age 12 and under 16 may be issued a licence to shoot small game, coyotes, fur bearing animals and wild birds permitted to be harvested under the authority of a Migratory Game Bird Hunting Permit during an open season. Requirements include:

  • Youth must carry written consent of a parent or person who has custody of the youth
  • Youth must be accompanied by a designated adult
  • A designated adult who is not the parent or person who has custody of the youth must be designated in writing
  • Youth must complete required hunter and firearms training courses and trapper education courses
  • Youth and Designated Adult must possess Outdoor Identification Card or equivalent document

Youth at age 16 and under 18 may obtain a licence to shoot big game during the open season provided the youth is accompanied and supervised by a designated adult. Requirements include:

  • Youth must carry written consent of a parent or person who has custody of the youth
  • Youth must be accompanied by a designated adult
  • A designated adult who is not the parent or person who has custody of the youth must be designated in writing
  • Youth must complete required hunter and firearms training courses
  • Youth and Designated Adult must possess an Outdoor Identification Card or equivalent document

 

What has not changed?

  • Youth age 16 and under 18 may continue to be issued a licence to shoot small game, coyote, fur bearing animals and wild birds permitted to be harvested under the authority of a Migratory Game Bird Permit during the open season without consent to purchase a licence.
  • Youth age 16 and under 18 may obtain their own Federal Minor’s Firearm Possession Licence to use firearms
  • A youth at 16 and 17 who holds a valid small game, coyote, trapping licence or Migratory Game Bird Hunting Permit noted in this category and who does not possess a Minors Firearms Possession Licence are required to be accompanied and supervised by a fully licenced adult.

Designated Adults

A designated adult must meet the following criteria:

  • is a person who is over the age of 18
  • is not prohibited from carrying, transporting, possessing or using a firearm or from being a designated adult
  • is eligible for the same type of licence under which the youth is hunting, taking or killing an animal by shooting

While accompanying the youth, a designated adult shall:

  • remain at arm’s length of the youth; and
  • be able to take control of the firearm if necessary
  • not accompany and supervise more than 2 youths at one time
  • carry evidence of his or her eligibility to hold the same type of licence as the youth adult (e.g. possess an Outdoor Identification Card or similar document)
  • if not the parent of person who has custody of the youth provide a designation in writing signed by a parent or person who has custody of the youth (carried by the youth or designated adult)

 

Injured Animals

  • A designated adult may shoot an animal that has been injured by a youth under for the purposes of assisting the youth and shall keep the youth in sight at all times.
  • A designated adult is not required to keep the youth in sight at all times where the designated adult is pursuing an animal that has been injured by the youth.
  • With respect to Migratory Game Birds, the designated adult would also be required to hold a valid Migratory Game Bird Hunting Permit in addition to the Outdoor Identification Card or similar document.

 

Applying for a Youth Licence

Small Game

  • A licence to shoot small game or coyotes shall not be issued to a youth age 12 and under 16 without written consent of a parent or person who has custody of the youth and must be presented to local vendor outlets at the time of purchase.
  • The consent must be carried by the youth or the designated adult while hunting small game, coyotes or while hunting under the authority of a Migratory Game Bird Hunting Permit.
  • Small Game Licences for snaring only will continue to be provided to youth under 16 years of age shall be marked “not valid for shooting” .

 

Big Game

  • Licence applications for big game black bear on the Island may be obtained up until the close of the hunting season and can be issued to a youth age 16 and under 18.
  • A written consent of parent of person who has custody of the youth must be carried by the youth or designated adult.
  • In Labrador, a licence to shoot black bear shall not be issued to a youth age 16 and under 18 without written consent of a parent.
  • Big Game Licence Applications for Moose/Caribou issued through the draw process will be mailed automatically to a youth who turns age 16 before August 31 and once he or she completes required hunter and firearm training courses.

 

General Trapper Licences

 

  • A licence to shoot fur bearing animals shall not be issued to a youth age 12 and under 16 without without written consent of a parent or person who has custody of the youth.
  • A written consent of a parent of person who has custody of the youth must be carried by the youth or designated adult.
  • Trapper Licence Applications may be processed up until the close of the trapping seasons.

 

Consent Forms

  • For more information or to obtain a copy of a Consent/Designate Adult Form, contact your nearest Fisheries and Land Resources Office or email wildlifelicense@gov.nl.ca
  • Consent documents will be incorporated into future application and online processes managed by the Wildlife Division.

 

Updated Program for Hunters with a Disability

  • The Program for Hunters and Anglers with a disability has been updated to provide more flexibility for persons with disabilities to access the activity of hunting.
  • The current requirement for a designated hunter to remain in line of sight of the person with a disability has been amended to require the designated hunter to remain within 800m, or line of sight, whichever is greater of the person with a disability.
  • The distance requirement is based on the location of the persons involved in the hunt, not the animal.
  • This change is effective immediately.
  • For next season an additional option will also be added to the program. Under the current Problem Moose Policy (animals dispatched to protect commercial crops) animals dispatched by farmers are identified by the Province and made available to all hunters based on first come first serve lists maintained at district offices.
  • This policy will be updated to give priority access to persons with a disability who cannot participate in hunting.
  • The Province will also be developing a policy to allow access for persons with a disability to animals put down by Conservation Officers. These would be animals that are alive when encountered by officers, but for a number of reasons (e.g. injuries or public safety) have to be put down.
  • Persons with a disability who are on a district list for an animal from the Problem Moose Policy would also be eligible for these animals.
  • To receive an animal from either of the Program options listed above the person with a disability must have received a big game license in the big game license draw. This will not result in increased harvest of the populations outside of the draw system.

New Target Dates for the Big Game Draw

The Province will be shifting the timeline for the big game draw process for the 2018/19 season. The New timeline will be as follows:

  • February 19, 2018 – Big Game Applications mailed out.
  • March 30, 2018 – Application Deadline.
  • May 1, 2018 – Big Game Draw Result Notifications Released.

Not-for-profit Big Game Licenses

The Not-for-profit Program has not been changed. The program has good participation rates and can be summarized as follows:

  • 370 licences were made available throughout the province to qualified not-for-profit organizations. Those organizations may in turn utilize qualified resident big game hunters to secure the meat for charities and service groups who use it for fundraising purposes.
  • Applications are only accepted from incorporated not-for-profit or registered charitable organizations operating in Newfoundland and Labrador.
  • Non-incorporated committees and groups are not be eligible for a NFP Moose Licence. However, if they are affiliated in some way with a larger group that is incorporated, the larger group may apply on their behalf.
  • Application deadline coincides with Big Game Licence Draw application deadline.
  • There is no fee associated with this licence.
  • Each years draw process will be independent of previous draws, and no preferential consideration is given to applicants unsuccessful in previous years.
  • Existing provisions related to the distribution of harvested big game meat apply.  Ie, 87.(1) “the minister or his or her agent may by written permission authorize any religious, charitable or educational organization to serve the meat of game with meals, for which a charge is made.)
  • All other laws of general application for hunting are applicable.
  • Seasons are consistent with those outlined in the 2017-18 Hunting & Trapping Guide.
  • 387 Applications in 2017/18

 

 

Dates Announced for Outdoor Expo 2018

Mark your calendars for May 4-6, 2018 and plan to join us at the 4th Annual Newfoundland Sportsman Outdoor Expo at The Paradise Double Ice Complex. See pics of last year’s Expo here!

The Newfoundland Sportsman Online

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Season 12 is Here!

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Photo of the week

7 year old Harley Chaffey, from Robinsons on the west coast of NL caught these speckled trout April 2nd. Send us your picture and it could be chosen as Photo of the Week and you'll get a free Subscription to The Newfoundland Sportsman!

Recipe
Thai Salmon Cakes
By Chef Maurice Boudreau

A sincere thank you to all who visited the Newfoundland Sportsman Expo this past March in Paradise and took in some of my cooking demonstrations. What a pleasure meeting and talking to all hands who stopped by. It was, by far, the best show yet in my opinion, and I’m already thinking about what we can cook for next year’s Outdoor Expo.

This is one dish I demonstrated, and just as I thought, it was a crowd-pleaser. Thai food is certainly not my fortè but trust me when I say, it’s easier than you think. The key to Thai food is creating a balance of flavour, specifically sour, salty, sweet and hot (spicy). My goal, for simplicity, was to sweeten the rice, have the cucumber salad spicy and sour, and season the salmon cakes using the fish sauce. This dish is packed with so much flavour and freshness, I guarantee you’ll make an extra trip to fill all your tags.

moeMaurice Boudreau is a Red Seal Chef currently lending his skill and creativity to The Hungry Heart Café on Rawlin’s Cross in St. John’s. The Café is a social enterprise initiative of Stella’s Circle. Maurice has a passion for local food that he is happy to share whenever he gets the opportunity.

For more on Stella’s Circle and the force that it is visit their website: http://stellascircle.ca

Salmon Cakes: (Serves 4)

1.5 lbs Salmon

½ cup Green onion, chopped

2 Eggs

½ cup Panko crumbs (Japanese bread crumb)

2 Limes, zest and juice

2 Tbls Ginger, grated

¼ cup Basil, chopped

¼ cup Cilantro, chopped

2 Tbls Chili paste, Sambal Oelek brand

3 Tbls Fish sauce

Coconut Rice:

2 cups Jasmine Rice, rinsed well

1 can Coconut milk

1 Tbls Sugar

1 tsp Salt

Water

Cucumber Salad:

1 lrg Cucumber, sliced thin

¼ cup Cherry tomatoes, cut in 1/4’s

½ or 1 Red thai chilies, de-seeded, sliced thin

¼ cup Peanuts, toasted and chopped

2 Tbls Mint, chopped

2 Tbls Fish sauce

2 Limes, juiced

2 Tbls Rice vinegar

1 Tbls Sugar

Method

Start by preparing the cucumber salad. You want to give the salad time to sit and pickle in the juices and let the heat leach out of the peppers. Words of advice – always use gloves when working with chili peppers and wash all utensils immediately after they’ve been prepared. These thai peppers are very spicy and should be handled with care.

To make the salad, combine the thin slice cucumber, chili pepper, mint, sugar and liquid ingredients. Toss together and let sit.

The tomatoes I cut in quarters separately and leave to drain. They will be added right before we serve the salad, along with the peanuts.

For the rice I recommend using a rice cooker as well as a good brand of rice. I used Lundberg brand and found it worked excellent. Following your rice cooker guidelines to prepare 2 cups of rice, I substituted half the water with coconut milk, stirred in the sugar and salt and turned it on. The beauty of using a rice cooker is set it and forget it. My batch took approximately 25 minutes.

The salmon cake mixture, once made, will not have a texture of our beloved salt fish cake, so don’t panic if it isn’t stiff enough to form into a cake; it shouldn’t be. It will be loose and easy to spoon into the pan. (More time for fishing and less time spent forming cakes. Bonus!)

Small dice the salmon and place in a large bowl, add the remaining ingredients and mix. Then take half the salmon mixture and place in a food processor, pulsing a couple times for a slightly smoother mixture. This process, along with the eggs and crumbs, help bind the cake mixture together when it hits the pan. If you didn’t, then it would just fry up as small diced salmon.

Heat a frying pan over medium heat and add some canola oil. Once heated, spoon the mix in a couple batches around the pan, making free form salmon cakes. You will notice how quick these are to cook and will only need a minute or two before being flipped. If the mixture seems too runny, add more crumb to help stiffen it up.

So if you need a good excuse to get back on the river fishing this season, give this recipe a shot. If it works, your significant other may even encourage more fishing. Thankfully, my wife loves Thai food; lucky me. As a note to remember when making these recipes, it doesn’t have to be exactly as written; follow it as a guide, feel free to adjust it according to your personal taste. Increase or decrease amounts as you like for the flavours. Heck, depending on how much you increase the chilies, you can be sure you’ll knock some socks off!